What is Osmosis? | Definition, Examples, and How It Works

Question: What is Osmosis?

  1. Solvent molecules from a region of high solute concentration to a region of low solute concentration across a semipermeable membrane.
  2. Solute molecules from a region of high concentration to a region of low concentration across a semipermeable membrane.
  3. Solvent molecules from a region of high water potential to a region of low water potential across a semipermeable membrane.
  4. Solute molecules from a region of high water potential to a region of low water potential across a semipermeable membrane.

Answer: (C)

Solution:

Osmosis is the movement of solvent molecules from a region of high water potential to a region of low water potential across a semipermeable membrane. A semipermeable membrane is one that allows only solvent molecules to pass through and not solute molecules. Water potential is a measure of how much water wants to move from one place to another.

Explanation of osmosis:

Osmosis is a spontaneous process, which means that it does not require any energy input. It occurs because water molecules are constantly moving in random directions. When there is a difference in water potential between two solutions, the water molecules will move from the region of high water potential to the region of low water potential. This movement of water molecules is osmosis.

Example of osmosis:

When you place a raisin in a glass of water, the raisin will swell up. This is because the water potential inside the raisin is lower than the water potential outside the raisin. As a result, water molecules move from the water outside the raisin to the water inside the raisin through the semipermeable membrane of the raisin. This movement of water molecules causes the raisin to swell up.

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